fender usa jazz bass

From 1960 until late 1970, the two pickups on the Jazz Bass were spaced 3.6 in (91 mm) apart. The Highway One Jazz Bass is a moderately priced American-made bass introduced in 2003, featuring a Leo Quan BadAss II bridge with grooved saddles, Posiflex graphite neck support rods, 1970s styling and a Greasebucket tone circuit since 2006. Usually known as "Boner" Jazz Basses, these early American Standard models (designed by George Blanda, who was Fender's senior R&D engineer during that period) were discontinued in 1994 and shouldn't be confused with the Fender Jazz Bass Plus, which has the same 22-fret neck design, but utilizes a different (downsized) body styling, Lace Sensor pickups, Schaller "Elite" fine-tuner bridge on the four-string model or Gotoh Hardware high-mass bridge on the 5-string model, and Phil Kubicki-designed active electronics. The bass is distinct from the Precision Bass in that its tone is brighter and richer in the midrange and treble with less emphasis on the fundamental harmonic. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Jazz Bass, first introduced in 1960, Fender released in 2010 the 50th Anniversary Limited Edition Jazz Bass. Block-shaped fingerboard inlays and an optional maple fingerboard were introduced after 1966/67. These were soon changed to the Bill Turner-designed dual-coil Ceramic Noiseless units with nickel-plated (gold-plated on certain models) polepieces until the advent of the Bill Lawrence-designed Samarium Cobalt series in 2004. Various 2- or 3-color sunbursts, Various shades of white, blue, red, green, etc. First introduced in 1960 as the Deluxe Model, it borrowed design elements from the Jazzmaster guitar . Fender offers its 5-string basses with rosewood or maple fretboard as of 2006 after discontinuing the pau ferro fingerboard option in late 2005. As well as having a slightly different, less symmetrical and more contoured body shape (known in Fender advertising as the "Offset Waist Contour" body), the Jazz Bass neck is noticeably narrower at the nut than that of the Fender Precision Bass. A fourth push button control is available on American-made Jazz Basses produced between mid-2003 until 2008. [citation needed]. First introduced in 1960 as the Deluxe Model, it borrowed design elements from the Jazzmaster guitar. The Jazz Plus debuted in 1989 (the five-string model was released in 1990), discontinued in 1994 and replaced by the USA Deluxe Series Jazz Bass the following year. In 2008, Fender offered both the four- and five-string versions of the 24-fret Jazz Bass in a stealthy Flat Black finish (with matching headstocks and hardware). Fender discontinued the five-string version in 2009. A number of cosmetic changes were made to the instrument when CBS purchased the Fender companies in 1965. The Jazz Plus Bass was available with an alder body and the option of a natural-finish ash body on the four-string model for a $100 upcharge, either a maple or rosewood fretboard on the four-string and pau ferro (an exotic hardwood whose tone is brighter than rosewood yet warmer than ebony) on the five-string. They came with 22 frets, abalone dot position inlays and an 18-volt power supply on some models. The Highway One Jazz Bass is a moderately priced American-made bass introduced in 2003, featuring a Leo Quan BadAss II bridge with grooved saddles, Posiflex graphite neck support rods, 1970s styling and a Greasebucket tone circuit since 2006. American Standard Jazz Basses produced between 1989 and 19941⁄2 featured a larger body shape, a 'curved' neck plate set into a chambered pocket for greater sustain and a 22-fret neck, similar to that of a Precision Bass Plus, with a standard vintage-style top-load bridge, two separate volumes and a master TBX tone circuit. White pickup covers and a pickguard/control plate were introduced the same year. Prior to the early 70's, most Jazz basses had bodies made of alder, except for those that were finished in a clear or("natural") finish - for those basses ash was nearly always the wood of choice. The 5-string version was introduced in 2007. These two-octave Jazz Basses were gone from the Fender pricelist as of 2009. To celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Jazz Bass, first introduced in 1960, Fender released in 2010 the 50th Anniversary Limited Edition Jazz Bass. While the Precision Bass was originally styled similarly to the Telecaster guitar (and, after 1957, the Stratocaster), the Jazz Bass' styling was inspired more by the Jazzmaster guitar, with which the Jazz shared its offset body and sculpted edges that differentiate it from other slab-style bass bodies. In 2008, Fender introduced the fretted and fretless Steve Bailey signature models, its first six-string Jazz Basses to feature a 9.5" to 14" compound-radius ebony fingerboard. Usually known as "Boner" Jazz Basses, these early American Standard models (designed by George Blanda, who was Fender's senior R&D engineer during that period) were discontinued in 1994 and shouldn't be confused with the Fender Jazz Bass Plus, which has the same 22-fret neck design, but utilizes a different (downsized) body styling, Lace Sensor pickups, Schaller "Elite" fine-tuner bridge on the four-string model or Gotoh high-mass bridge on the 5-string model, and Phil Kubicki-designed active electronics. Fender switched to pearloid blocks/binding on all necks in mid-to-late 1974. Learn more about Fender electric basses. The American Deluxe Jazz Bass (available in four-string fretted and fretless, five-string fretted and left-hand versions) featured two Samarium Cobalt Noiseless Jazz Bass pickups, designed by pickup designer Bill Lawrence. By the mid-1970's the combination of 4" pickup spacing and the use of heavier ash bodies with maple fingerboards combined to produce a notably brighter tone than that produced by Jazz basses from the 60's. The American Deluxe series was discontinued in 2016. The Standard Jazz Bass model is sanded, painted and assembled in Ensenada, Baja California along with the other Standard Series guitars. The five-string version (introduced in 1992), available with pau ferro or rosewood fingerboard and a five-in-line tuner configuration with Gotoh Mini machineheads (c. 2006), has been updated with a tinted maple neck featuring a dark rosewood fingerboard and a 4+1 tuner configuration with Fender/Ping tuning machines as of 2009. At first necks with rosewood fretboards received pearloid blocks/binding and maple fretboard necks received black. The original intention of the instrument was to appeal to upright bass players. Because of this, many bass players who want to be more "forward" in the mix (including smaller bands such as power trios) prefer the Jazz Bass. Known as Jazz Bass Deluxe since introduced as part of a major reworking of Fender's Electric Bass lineup in 1995, they have been renamed the American Deluxe Jazz Bass to the public as of August 2000 in a Bass Player magazine review of the new "Fender American Deluxe Precision V" five-string counterpart model to the American Deluxe Jazz Bass. These colours were previously available only for the Japanese domestic market. Unlike the Fender Precision Bass Plus, which had a "maple-neck" option, the Boner Jazz Bass was offered only with a rosewood fingerboard. Fender discontinued these models in 2007. Over the following years as the use of mutes gradually declined both the Precision and Jazz Bass models eventually began to be produced without bridge/tailpiece covers. Fender discontinued these models in 2007. [citation needed] The Jazz Bass 24 featured a sleek alder body, a 34"-scale length, modern "C" shaped maple neck with a two-octave rosewood fingerboard, abalone dot inlays, 24 medium-jumbo frets, Hipshot-licensed tuners, Fender/Gotoh High Mass top-loading bridge, two custom-wound Seymour Duncan SJB-3 Quarter Pound pickups, a passive/active push/pull volume knob and a 3-band active EQ with a "slap" mid-scoop switch. As well as having a slightly different, less symmetrical and more contoured body shape (known in Fender advertising as the "Offset Waist Contour" body), the Jazz Bass neck is noticeably narrower at the nut than that of the Fender Precision Bass. It was available in the Fender price list as part of the Deluxe Series line, with Cherry Sunburst (discontinued as of 2007) and Tobacco Sunburst finishes over a quilted maple top and chrome-plated hardware. The American Elite Jazz Bass, introduced in 2016, sports a compound modern C-to-D neck shape, fourth-generation noiseless pickups, a "spoke-wheel" truss rod system for easier neck relief adjustments and a new asymmetrical neck heel.

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